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LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

COLLARD WRAPS

03/01/17 — Heydon Hatcher

By Mackenzie Smith

Raw collards are sweet and crunchy; hearty enough to hold a meal-full of fillings. My first collard wraps were inspired by Vietnamese spring rolls: noodles, sprouts, pork, shrimp, mint & cilantro, served with fish sauce. They were a hit, and once I realized collards are the perfect vessel for anything savory, stuffing a big leaf full of leftover _____ with a sprinkle of this and that has become a meal we crave regularly.

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

The wrap in this picture is made with leftover brown rice and shredded beef shortrib from Dai Due, watermelon radish, mint, cilantro, sesame, scallion and hot sauce.

Prep your fillings (chop veggies, herbs) and set them up so they are easy to get to as you build your wrap, starting with grains and ending with crunch or hot sauce.

Use your leftovers! Get creative!

Pick one of each:

  • Grain or noodle: brown rice, quinoa, noodles, couscous, freekeh, barley
  • Protein: seitan, tofu, shrimp, chicken, beef, pork, poached/fried/scrambled egg, leftover sloppy joe filling, taco meat-- you get the picture


Add a healthy sprinkle of any or all:
  • Mint, cilantro, basil, parsley, scallion, chives


Crunch:
  • Julienned or shredded fresh carrots, watermelon radish, jicama or sprouts
  • Pickles
  • Nuts & seeds
  • Crispy shallots or garlic
  • Potato chips (yes)


Finishing with a few shakes of hot sauce is non-negotiable in this house, but to each their own.

Maybe this reminds you of a more virtuous Chipotle situation? Get into it!

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

Prep your collards:

Gently swish around whole collard leaves in a big bowl of water before letting them sit for about 10 minutes. Take the leaves out of the water and give them one more quick rinse under the faucet before patting them dry with a towel. (While this step may seem gratuitous, collards are inherently dirty, coming up from the earth the way they do. Nothing says “don’t do this again” like a mouthful of grit.) Aim to leave as much of the leaf in tact as possible as you remove the thickest part of the spine from each one. If the leaves are small, place one on top of the other to cover the slit from removing the spine reinforce your wrap and make room for more filling. If your leaves are on the larger side, just use one for each wrap, starting with the slit side and rolling inward.

Starting with the grain or noodle, spoon it into the middle of the leaf, then add protein, herbs and crunch. Finish with hot sauce. Air on the conservative side as you build your wrap, especially the first go-round. Once you have tried it a few times, you will begin to see about how much a leaf can handle based on its size.

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

TIME TO PREP YOUR BACKYARD GARDEN!

03/03/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

It's about ripe time to start getting that backyard, side yard, or community garden plot ready for a bountiful spring and summer. If you're like us at JBG, your hands are itching with the urge to get out and fill that garden with new plants. Before you start planting though, we've got a few tips to ensure your 2016 garden is as productive and healthy as possible!

Be sure to check out the details for our Annual Transplant Sale, as well as a special gardening workshop with Brenton, at the bottom of the page!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Check your Tools

It happens to the best of us - tools lying around, rain barrels getting a little slimy, trellises falling apart. Now is the best time to get everything clean and ready for you to hit the ground running when your pick up your organic transplants! Organize that shed, clean your tools, fix any broken fences or irrigation, and get ready for a great year!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Clear your Garden

Whether you put in a winter cover crop, or you have leftover fall crop residues, or even if your garden has filled up with grass (hey, we'll count that one as a cover crop too), it's time to clear that bed in preparation for the new! We recommend cutting whatever is left in your garden down to ground level. You can compost the residues or dig them right into your garden to decompose.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Aerate your Soil

Next, you'll want to start getting your soil ready for the transplants. First things first, it's time to loosen the soil. Over time, water, gravity, and sedimentation slowly compact your garden soil. Compacted soil is not as productive - your plants need lots of oxygen around their roots and plenty of space for water to trickle down. You can use a digging fork to loosen the soil, or use the double digging technique. If you have rocky or poorly aerated soil, consider building yourself a raised-bed garden to give those plants the fluffy soils they need to thrive.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Compost, Compost, Compost!

The next step is to make sure your soils are healthy and fed! We recommend applying a few inches of compost to your garden every year. This provides your garden space with nutrient rich organic matter and a host of microorganisms. Not only is compost a fantastic, natural, slow-release fertilizer, but it will increase the water-holding capacity of your soil, and decrease erosion.

You can go a step further and get your soil tested - this will tell you if you need to add any micronutrients or amendments to your soil. Here at the farm we test with a number of laboratories to attain the best possible soils we can, but for the casual home gardener, this step is not as necessary.

You can also find a comprehensive, month-by-month list of tips for central Texas from our friends at The Natural Gardener.

Alright, you're ready to start planting, now what?

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Come to the Annual Transplant Sale

Our greenhouses are filling up with spring transplants for your backyard! This year's Transplant Sale will be held at our Garfield Farm greenhouses on March 4th, 11th, and 18th. Transplants will also be available for pickup at any of our farmers market locations or straight to your doorstep if you order online!

This year's sale is bigger than ever, and we can't wait to see your home gardens flourish. This year's selection is immensely extensive and varied... we have 110 different fruit, herb, and veggie offerings including varieties from Slow Food’s Ark of Taste!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Learn from a Pro

Our very own farmer Brenton is the king of taking a backyard garden to the extreme. This month, he's going to share some of his knowledge to equip all of you Central Texas gardeners with the education needed to make sure your families are well fed this year. Join us on Saturday, March 11th for the Organic Backyard Gardening Workshop with Brenton Johnson.

When: Saturday, March 11th, 10 am - 12:30pm

Where: Our Garfield Farm! 4008 River Road, Garfield TX, 78612

Tickets: Available now!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Nitty Gritty:
  • This workshop is designed to equip Central Texas gardeners with the tools they need to plan and execute a successful spring vegetable garden, and is designed for novice and experienced gardeners, alike.
  • Topics will include: site selection, soil prep, soil fertility, irrigation, planting guidelines, variety selection, and pest management.
  • Workshop instructor will give useful, hands-on demos of proper planting, watering, and harvesting techniques, with a special focus on tomatoes.
  • Participants will have an opportunity for an open discussion and Q&A session with Brenton.
Backyard Bonuses:
  • All workshop participants will enjoy 10% off their entire transplant order.
  • Following the workshop, participants are invited to go on a walk-about with Brenton, where he will give a tour of a portion of the farm.
  • All workshop participants are invited to bring a picnic and enjoy the Spring farmscapes.
  • Participants will also receive a special discount to our CSA, as a type of crop insurance in case their backyard garden is less than bountiful :)
  • If you bring your kiddos, we will have a JBG volunteer there to bring them on a farm walk-about and some sand pile exploration.
Spring on the farm is a super busy time, so if you are looking to dip your toes in a career rooted in agriculture, check out our job listings! We would love to welcome you to the JBG fam!

Ever visited our favorite zero-waste grocery store, in.gredients? Well, they have hit quite a rough patch and need the community's help! After more than four years as a leader in sustainability and the local food economy, they need to raise $30,000 for strategic infrastructure investments. Over 50 local vendors and fellow small businesses have rallied behind them by donating products, classes, tastings, tours & parties for campaign perks so that we may keep their doors open and secure their future in this rapidly growing city. Want to contribute? Check out their indiegogo campaign here.

WEEK 9 IN PHOTOS

03/03/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Rainbow Chard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rainbow Chard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Come see us this weekend at our annual Transplant Sale! Taking place the first three weekends of this month, you have ample opportunity to come out to River Road and peruse our extensive menu of transplant offerings. Heck, you don't even have to wait until this weekend to check out the varieties, you can order online now! Check it out here.

Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Workin' on the orchard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Workin' on the orchard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Hydrating the transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Hydrating the transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Birds helping Montana out. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Birds helping Montana out. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Montana at work. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Montana at work. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Spinach. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Spinach. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Big skies. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Big skies. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The prettiest salad you ever did see. Photo by Scott David Gordon. The prettiest salad you ever did see. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Curly kale details. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Curly kale details. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Cover crop beauties. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Cover crop beauties. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 6TH

03/07/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 6th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 6th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Brussels Greens
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Kohlrabi, Purple
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Radish, French Breakfast
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Small Box
Beet, Chioggia
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Radish, Watermelon
Individual Box
Beet, Golden
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Braising Mix
Greens, Spinach
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 6TH

03/07/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 6th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 6th

Medium Box
Beet, Chioggia
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Spearmint
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon

BEET HUMMUS

03/08/17 — Heydon Hatcher

unnamed-1By Megan Winfrey

Beets are one of my favorite ingredients to cook with, because they make every dish so beautiful! How could anyone resist that perfect magenta? Beet hummus is extremely easy to make and absolutely delicious. It freezes well, so double or triple this recipe and get your beet fix all year long!

Beet Hummus
  • 2-3 small beets
  • 1 can chick peas, drained
  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tbs. tahini, heaping
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Wash and scrub the beets well before roasting. Place the beets on some foil, drizzle with olive oil, wrap up, and roast for 45 minutes-1 hour, or until a knife inserted falls out without resistance. You want them to be very tender. Cool and peel the beets, then place them into a food processor or blender. Blend until only small bits remain. Add everything but the olive oil, blend until smooth. Continue blending while slowing adding the olive oil. Adjust salt and pepper to taste and if the hummus is too thick, add water little bits at a time.

Freeze in an airtight container for up to 6 months, or keep in the fridge for up to one week.

Beet Hummus is a JBG breakroom favorite!

Breakroom birthday snacks.

A post shared by ada lisa broussard (@adalisab) on



WEEK 10 IN PHOTOS

03/10/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Spinach. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Spinach. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Week 10 has entailed a whole lot of hustlin' over here at the farm. With the 2017 Transplant Sale underway, we are running the farm as per usual, but also focusing a ton of energy on the sale! We have two more Saturdays of transplant-slingin' left, so if you missed this past weekend, don't worry, you've got plenty of time. If you come out tomorrow, you can catch Brenton Johnson, the OG backyard farmer gone wild, hosting an Organic Gardening Workshop. Find ticket info here. Don't miss out! If you'd rather order from the comfort of your home to your farmer's market of choice or even to your doorstep, check out our online shop here!

Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Dandelion green harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Dandelion green harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm chariot. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplants going into the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants going into the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Grabbin' transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Grabbin' transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Curly kale, ready for market. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Curly kale, ready for market. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Chard details. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Chard details. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Montana's view. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Montana's view. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Grapes! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Grapes! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Vineyard work. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Vineyard work. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Grape development update. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Grape development update. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplant sale. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant sale. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants galore. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplants galore. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants galore. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplants galore. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants galore. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 13TH

03/14/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 13th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 13th

Large Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Spearmint
Kohlrabi, Purple
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Red
Radish, Purple Daikon
Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Dill
Herb, Spearmint
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Red
Radish, French Breakfast
Small Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Herb, Spearmint
Leek
Onion, Spring Red
Radish, Red
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 13TH

03/14/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 13th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 13th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow

2017 SPRING PICNIC BANNER

03/15/17 — Farm

2017 spring picnic and garden gallop





 

SLAB PIE

03/16/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Header Image. Green Slab PieBy Mackenzie Smith

Last week’s CSA brought me more hearty greens than I had the wherewithal or time to handle in separate dishes each night of the week, and I wanted a way to cook them all at once and make them shine.

Justin’s Swiss Chard Slab Pie with Salt and Pepper Crust, from Kristin Donnelly’s Modern Potluck, was my answer to that haul of greens I was willing to work with for a few hours on a Sunday. Take beet greens, kale, swiss chard, collards: all leaves hearty enough to stand up to a slow simmer in white wine spiced with coriander and ginger, an onion and a hefty dose of garlic to balance the bitter. Mix the cooked greens with sour cream for a rich filling, enveloped by a flaky crust flecked with black pepper and you have a perfect offering to bring to a potluck. Once you make this salt and pepper crust in slab form, don’t be surprised when you start thinking of new ways to fill it.

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

The recipe below is straight out of the Modern Potluck cookbook. I have made it once exactly as directed, and once with a mixture of beet, kale, chard and collard greens, shallot in place of onion, and labne in place of sour cream. Both versions were well-loved and leftovers scarce. Let’s Potluck!

For the Dough
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 ¼ cups (2 ½ sticks) butter, cold, cubed
  • ⅔ cups ice water
For the Filling
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large red onion, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • Red pepper flakes
  • 3 pounds red swiss chard, stems separated and cut into ¼-inch pieces, leaves roughly chopped
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • ¾ cup sour cream
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon water, for brushing


Make the dough: In a food processor, pulse the flour with the salt and pepper. And the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles course meal with some pea-size pieces remaining. Sprinkle the ice water on top and pulse until the dough just comes together. Scrape the dough out onto a work surface and gather it into a ball, divide in half and pat each half into a 6-inch square. Wrap he squares in plastic and refrigerate until well-chilled, about 1 hour.

Meanwhile, make the filling: In a pot, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic and a generous pink of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until just softened, about 5 minutes. Add the coriander, ginger, and a pinch of red pepper flakes and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chard stems (beet greens, collards, kale stems too), and cook, stirring occasionally, until just softened. Stor in the chard leaves in large handfuls, letting them wilt slightly before adding more. Add the wine, reduce the heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the leaves are tender and the liquid has evaporated, 10-20 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a colander and let cool completely.

Preheat the oven to 400 F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, mix the cooled chard with the sour cream and season with salt, pepper and more red pepper flakes, if desired.

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out 1 piece of the dough to a 12x16-inch rectangle baking sheet. Spread the filling evenly over the dough, leaving a 1-inch border. Roll out the remaining dough to a 12x16-inch rectangle. Ease the dough over the filling, fold the rim over itself, and pinch the edges or crimp decoratively to seal. Cut a few slits in the top of the pie. Brush the egg wash over the top of the pie, and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.

Bake for 50 to 55 minutes, until the crust is golden. Let cool for at least 15 minutes before cutting it into squares. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

WEEK 11 IN PHOTOS

03/17/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We are in the last week of the 2017 Transplant Sale! Now's the time, tackle that backyard and turn it into a veggie oasis. It's easy... either order online or come out this Saturday and grab some of your favorite herbs, fruits, and/or veggies! In no time, you'll have your own harvest at home! Find more info here. We can't wait to see you!

We are also looking forward to the Spring Picnic and Garden Gallop 5K in April. We are chompin' at the bit to explore the farm and get our dance on with you, our farm community. Check it out!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT: LUCAS RAGER, DRIVER EXTRAORDINARE

03/17/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Time for another installment of one of our most favorite blog series: the Employee Spotlight! We hope that these interviews will help acquaint you with the folks on the farm who are largely responsible for keeping the delicious JBG vegetables rolling out, week after week.

This week, we tracked down Lucas Rager, who is immensely integral in that aforementioned "rolling out" as he is our wholesale and restaurant delivery driver (sometimes CSA driver, too!). He has been transporting veggies and saving the day at JBG for nearly three years. You’ve probably seen him slinging produce at your favorite grocery store whilst sporting some wild and eclectic garb with a smile on his face. He treks all over our great state in the name of farm-fresh vegetables, and always has JBG’s back when we're in a pinch. He creates amazing farm-toons for us with the most recent being out stellar Garden Gallop flyer... he’s a banjo-strummin’, story-tellin’, laughter-lovin’, hard-workin’ son of a gun! He’s our right hand man and we couldn’t be more grateful for him. Meet Lucas!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in western Pennsylvania, just outside of Pittsburgh.

What brought you to JBG?

Well, I saw an ad on Craigslist. I had been actively looking for a new job because I was working at a bar downtown (Cheer Up Charlie’s) and wanted a change of pace. So, I got the job and came over here. Seemed fun.

What was your first job at JBG?

Driver… that’s what I’ve always done. I started driving and doing restaurant deliveries as well as some CSA delivery routes. That’s what I do now, too.

How long have you been working here at JBG?

Almost exactly three years! I started working here in March/April of 2014.

What have you learned from your role at JBG?

I learned how to drive these trucks a whole lot better (box trucks and reefers). Driving through traffic, you get good experience. I’ve learned a lot about vegetables that I definitely didn’t know before. I learned how to get up early… and drive a forklift, too!

Do you cook a lot?

Not really. When I cook, it’s usually for myself, so most of the time I just grab some take-out. I make smoothies for breakfast every morning, though! I call them smoovies with a “v”. I always make the same smoovie every morning. It's tons of greens, like collards or kale, then almond milk, bananas, and then some berries or other fruit. I chug it and run out the door because I’m usually running late. I got this really nice blender, so I use it every day. It’s called the Nutri-Ninja... it has all the super sharp blades that are tiered. It’s like a weapon. It’s awesome.

What does your life look like off the farm?

I like watching Seinfeld a lot, reading Conan comic books, and I’ll go drink beers at the bar. My friends play in a French Cajun band, Chansons Et Soulards, and I go out and dance when they are playing. Fun fact: Lucas played Cupid and introduced one of the band members to their spouse! They play at the White Horse a lot. I’m not very good at dancing, but I like going out and listening to them. I play the banjo, too, so, I sit at home play the banjo and listen to old early country and folk music, like Charlie Pool. I live with Matt Pelkey (fellow JBG-er, check out his spotlight here), he’s a great roommate.

IMG_5724

What might people be surprised to learn about you?

I don’t know… I’m an open book. I feel like everyone already knows everything about me. I really like cats though. I don’t have a cat, but our neighbor’s cat stays at our house all the time. So, now we are friends. She’s really warmed up to me even though she's pretty mean. Fun fact: Lucas used to be a cab driver in Pittsburgh, and also lived in Savannah for seven years perfecting his banjo skills.

What’s your favorite vegetable?

Carrots are definitely my favorite vegetable. I put them in smoovies sometimes… I just like snacking on carrots. Lately I’ve been eating a ton of baba ganoush. I don’t really like eggplant any other way, but man, I love baba ganoush so much. I haven’t perfected my own baba yet, but I just discovered this place this past Tuesday called Phoenicia Bakery and Deli. It’s on S. Lamar and Manchaca (there’s one on Burnet, too). I’m going to start going there weekly and stocking up. They have the best baba and pita bread. It’s really cheap and seriously the best.

What’s your favorite season?

Fall. It’s real pretty. Up north it’s so pretty, with all the leaves changing… here it’s nice because it cools off a little.

Being the amazing cartoonist that you are… can you talk a little about your cartoon work?

I like doing cartoons. When I was a kid, I just copied the Sunday comics. I feel like I draw pretty well… I have really cartoon-y stuff. I like The Far Side and Gary Larson - I like the comics that are just really easy to read and don’t demand a lot of attention. You just look at it and get the joke right away.

By Lucas Rager. By Lucas Rager.

By Lucas Rager. By Lucas Rager.

By Lucas Rager. By Lucas Rager.

Since you created our awesome Spring Picnic and Garden Gallop poster, do you mind talking about it a little?

Oh, sure! I guess I tried to capture the themes of what's going on throughout the day… music, kids, running, and food. I wanted to make clear that it’s an all-ages event. I’ve been watching a ton of Seinfeld recently, so I just keep thinking about his face, and added him in there, too. There is an episode where he has to re-race his old nemesis from high school to prove he’s faster. So, I pulled from that.

By Lucas Rager. By Lucas Rager.

Tell us about your unique style.

I’ve been really sculpting and perfecting it over the years (said with a huge smile on his face). Not really thinking about it is the real trick. Whatever happens, happens.

Your car? 

Well, this is the first car I’ve ever owned. ‘Til I was around 32 or 33, I just rode a bicycle around. I decided to compensate for that by getting a total gas-guzzler. It’s a totally inefficient, big truck. I painted lightning bolts on it and painted wolves on the doors. I found some goat horns just up the road here on Christmas Day, actually, a few years ago. So, I cleaned them up and attached them to the grill. It’s a pretty flashy ride.

unnamed-1

Why wolves?

I think I was watching some wolf show on the Discovery Channel, and I’ve always thought that wolves are pretty cool.

What’s your spirit animal? Why?

I would say a goat because they have cool goatees and eat garbage. I mostly just think they look neat and have strange eyes like aliens.

If you were stuck on a desert island and could only bring 3 things what would they be?

This answer is better listened to, enjoy here!

JBG Employee Survey: If Lucas were a veggie, what would he be and why?

Daniel: A veggie that is quiet, tough, super nice and would do anything for you. Maybe a sweet potato. He’s always there to save the day.

Mike Mo: Papalo because he’s super unique.

Ada: Sweet potato. He’s so so sweet. Once you get into him, he’s insanely vibrant, so many secrets, skills, and interests. Sweet potatoes can also be the wackiest looking veggies… and Lucas is definitely one amazing and wacky dude.

Matt: An eggplant because he only eats baba ganoush.

Thanks, Lucas, for taking the time to meet and being awesome! 'Til next time, folks!

SPRING PICNIC AND GARDEN GALLOP 5K 2017!

03/17/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Graphic by the talented Lucas Rager. Graphic by the talented Lucas Rager.

Things sure are heatin’ up in good ole Austin, Texas! The rise of temperatures means the SXSW season arriving (can you believe it?!), and more importantly, the imminent and highly anticipated nearing of one of our favorite annual events, our Spring Picnic and 5k Garden Gallop! Tickets on sale now!!! On Saturday, 4/1, grab your family, friends, fellow farmers, and come out to the farm! Join your JBG family to celebrate the change of seasons by sharing your favorite dishes with your farm community. This farm-tastic event will be held at 4008 River Road, Garfield, TX, 78612. Just a hop and a skip away from the Austin-Bergstrom Airport! Tickets on sale now.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

For the 4th time, we're inviting you, our community, to tour our farm and participate in our 5k Garden Gallop. The racing experts at Rogue Running will be on site once again ensuring this run is tip-top and top-notch. Run, walk, skip or hop around the field and enjoy seeing your veggies growing all around you. This family friendly run/walk through our farm is the very best way to see the where your weekly produce takes root and offers an exciting opportunity to explore our 186 organic acres of farmland. Runners and walkers are lead through a short 3.1 mile path that takes you on a journey through rows of spring onions, mountains of tomato cages, and fields of flowers. Tickets to this year's Garden Gallop are only $10, and include admission to our picnic! Kids under 12 run for free!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

151114_SDG256034 Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Live Music, Picnic, BYOB: Need we say more? After the dust has settled, join us for our community picnic. Three local bands, including Possum Posse and High Plains Jamboree, will be playing music from 11:45 - 3:30 pm. We are over the moon about these bands and hope you are, too. If you’ve never heard of the two mentioned above, don’t fret, peruse the videos below to familiarize yourself. We know you’ll be tappin’ your toes in no time.

Possum Posse 

“Best known for the wildly popular viral video series, “Guy On A Buffalo,” Jomo & The Possum Posse made a name for themselves with their unique blend of cynicism, dead-eyed soul and anti-machismo honky-tonk. Their cult video series has surpassed 20 million views, garnering national attention from NPR’s All Things Considered, Forbes, G4’s Attack of the Show, and a slew of major media outlets… The band has established itself as one of the most talented, ridiculous and cerebrally entertaining live acts around. Their latest record, “Local Motive” skews heavily toward roots rock & roll and old-school country.” -Excerpt from the Possum Posse website

High Plains Jamboree

“It’s been said that High Plains Jamboree is a bluegrass band west of the Mississippi and a country band east of the Mississippi. The songs of mandolin and guitar player Brennen Leigh have been recorded by country stars Sunny Sweeney and Grammy winner Lee Ann Womack. Leigh has a cult following in Scandinavia, and has performed and recorded with artists such as Charlie Louvin, Robbie Fulks and Jim Lauderdale. Guitarist Noel McKay was discovered by Guy Clark in 1993 while performing at the Jimmie Rodgers Festival in Kerrville, Texas. Clark and McKay’s co-write “El Coyote” went on to win a Grammy for “Best Folk Album.” Bassist and old time banjo player Simon Flory performed throughout the mid south with his mentor, bluegrass legend Donny Catron (Tennessee Gentlemen, Jesse McReynolds, Doyle Lawson). He also studied and taught at Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music.” -Excerpt from the High Plains Jamboree website

150404_SDG226452 Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Bring a blanket, dancin’ shoes, a picnic, some cold brews, and kick back on the farm with us! AISD will be rolling out their brand spankin' new food truck to feed the masses if you forget a picnic... (or just want to test out the AISD cuisine). AISD's Nacho Average Food Truck will be serving globally-themed beef and vegetarian burgers. Be ready to take some notes, as they will be featuring dishes showcasing the versatility of JBG veggies in cooking! Not only will AISD be serving up delectable treats, but they will also be running some of the children games and activities! Tickets to this year's Picnic are $10, and include entrance to the 5k Garden Gallop. Kids under 12 get in free! Bring those kiddos brimful of energy, our sand pile, trampoline, and soccer field are just begging for some attention.

150404_SDG226193 Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Whether to Gallop or Picnic, we hope you'll join us for what is going to be a beautiful day at the farm! Call or e-mail the office if you have any questions or if you want to volunteer - 512-386-5273, farm@jbgorganic.com.

The Nitty Gritty:
  • What: Saturday, April 1
  • When: Doors Open: 10am, Garden Gallop : 11am, Music, Picnic + Kids Zone : 11:30 - 3:30pm
  • Where: 4008 River Road, Cedar Creek, TX 78612... We call this the Big Farm!
  • What to Bring: Your family and friends! Blankets or chairs, a picnic meal, and maybe some perfectly chilled beer or wine (BYOB). AISD will also be on site, showcasing their brand new food truck and slingin' their delicious eats.
  • What not to Bring: Dogs (Sorry, farmer's rules.)
  • Tickets: Tickets to the Garden Gallop/Community Picnic are just $10. This fee helps us pay the bands who so kindly volunteered their time! Kids under 12 get in free to both the Gallop + Picnic, just let us know how many are coming!
Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

If you haven’t checked out our transplant sale (find more info here!), come out to the farm this Saturday to grab some fruit, herb, and veggie transplants! Brenton will be teaching an organic gardening workshop that you won’t want to miss! Buy tickets here.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 20TH

03/21/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 20th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 20th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Greens, Tatsoi
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Radish, Red
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Parsley, Curly
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Radish, Purple Daikon
Small Box
Beet, Golden
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Dill
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Individual Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 20TH

03/21/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 20th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 20th

Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Dill
Herb, Spearmint
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Red
Radish, French Breakfast

BEET "CARPACCIO"

03/22/17 — Heydon Hatcher

unnamed-1By Megan Winfrey

If there isn't an entire cookbook dedicated to beets already, there should be. Hailed by Tom Robbins and others as "the food of the gods," this little root is so darn versatile - and one of the healthiest vegetables on the planet. Betalains, a form of phytonutrients found in beets, provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification support. And whether you're blending them into a sauce or roasting them with herbs, that earthy sweetness will shine through in the best way. This recipe is super simple and stars chioggia and golden beets, which bring a mild sweetness and (obviously) gorgeous color.

Beet "Carpaccio"
  • 2-3 each of small-medium chioggia and golden beets
  • Drizzle of olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 3 tbs. capers, chopped
  • 2 tbs. mint leaves, chopped
  • Greek Yogurt for garnish


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Wash and scrub the beets and pat dry. Lay them on a sheet of foil, then drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Wrap the foil into a packet, place on a baking sheet, and roast the beets for 40-45 minutes.

unnamed-2

Once done, remove the beets from the oven and let them cool to room temperature. Next, chill them in the refrigerator for a few hours, or until cold to the touch. Remove the chilled beets from the fridge, and using a dish rag, peel them by rubbing the dish rag over the beets. The skin should peel away easily. Next, slice the beets thinly with a mandolin or a sharp knife- then arrange them on the plate however you like. Once the beets are arranged, drizzle with olive oil and lemon juice and garnish with the capers, mint, and Greek Yogurt. Serve immediately.

WEEK 12 IN PHOTOS

03/24/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Transplant sale scene. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant sale scene. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We are floored by the immense support from our community at the 2017 Transplant Sale. It has definitively been the best one yet. A giant thanks from everyone here at the farm to everyone who came out! We can't wait to see what y'all have done with your backyard gardens. As the season wears on, be sure to tag us in your burgeoning garden photos!

Besides the usual and constant harvesting, we are knee-deep in new and very exciting projects. Stay tuned, we can't wait to share our progress! Be sure to visit us at markets during the weekend, summer crops are slowly trickling in. Thanks to Scott David Gordon for another batch of show-stopping images this week.

Transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Will, greenhouse king. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Will, greenhouse king. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sage babies. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sage babies. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Collards. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

170321_SDG314119 Harvest progress lines. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Pile of Chioggia. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Chioggia. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Carrot harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Carrots fresh from the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Carrot's POV. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Green wrinkles. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rows and rows. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Spinach. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Spinach harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. We can't get enough of these colors. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm chariot. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm chariot. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Carpool. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Krishna, Brenton, Chucha, and Roxy. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Krishna, Brenton, Chucha, and Roxy. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

SO, YOU WANT TO VOLUNTEER AT THE FARM?

03/24/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Do you find yourself spending most of the day away twiddling your fingers and day-dreaming about getting your hands dirty with newfound farm-friends in the sunshine? Do you often wish for a big ole box of delectable, organic veggies in exchange for your hard-work day in and day out? Well, you aren’t alone, and this dream is entirely attainable! In case you didn't know, we have volunteer opportunities galore here at JBG. Not only is it a good juncture to simultaneously get dirty and munch on some crunchy veggies, but also the perfect chance to make new friends and bond with pre-existing ones, too. You're sure to find interesting conversation whilst sorting veggies and enjoying the famously and finely-curated farm-fresh jams from the CSA Hergotz Packing Shed crew (if that's where you choose to donate your time!). Corporate groups are more than welcome, too! Slingin’ veggies on the farm with co-workers is not only a team-building experience, but also a good way to strengthen and solidify working relationships. The more the merrier for us, too. Tons of hands sure does get a lot done.

Corporate team-building. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Corporate team-building. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

JBG welcomes volunteers weekly at either of our two Austin locations. The first being the Garfield Farm (4008 River Rd. Cedar Creek, TX) which is where we grow all of our veggies. At this location, you will be able to do an amalgam of tasks... working out in the field, transplanting, harvesting, aiding in the seeding process; all the while, learning tons about farming from the JBG agriculture experts. Want to be a farmer, or just expand your horticultural know-how? This might be the location for you!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Once our produce is harvested, we transport it to our Packing Shed (our second volunteer location) at 9515 Hergotz Lane in East Austin. Here, volunteers help wash, sort, and pack veggies for our farmers markets and CSA boxes. You get the farm experience just right down the street from the airport, pretty cool, eh? Volunteers should wear sturdy shoes and bring plenty of water and snacks (this goes for both locations!). Depending on the season, we sometimes offer an additional Friday afternoon shift from 1-6 PM at the packing shed. We are looking for help Tuesday through Friday every week at either location! Like we alluded to earlier, if you volunteer for a half-day (8 am to 1 pm), we reward your hard-work for a share of farm-fresh veggies. YUM.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

If you're interested, please RSVP through this link. Please note that depending on the season, we may or may not be offering volunteer opportunities at our Garfield farm. You must receive confirmation email prior to coming to volunteer, and if you sign-up to volunteer, it is very important that you honor your commitment and arrive at the farm on-time at your scheduled location. Please note that due to liability concerns, all volunteers must be at least 18 years of age and sign a waiver before volunteering.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Have you heard? On Saturday, 4/1, grab your family, friends, fellow farmers, and come out to the farm! Join JBG to celebrate the change of seasons with our annual Spring Picnic and 5k Garden Gallop! This farm-tastic event will be held at our Garfield Farm. Just a hop and a skip away from the Austin-Bergstrom Airport! Tickets on sale nowWe need volunteers to work this event... so, if this piques your interest, email volunteer@jbgorganic.com to sign up!

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 27TH

03/28/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 27th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 27th

Large Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Spearmint
Kohlrabi, White
Leek
Onion, Green
Radish, Red
Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Spearmint
Leek
Onion, Green
Turnip, White Japanese
Small Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Mustard
Herb, Cilantro
Kohlrabi, White
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Radish, Red
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Leek
Radish, Easter Egg

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF MAR 27TH

03/28/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 27th CSA Box Contents Week of Mar 27th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Parsley, Curly
Leek
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Radish, Purple Daikon

BLACKENED KALE SALAD WITH QUINOA & SPRING ONION

03/30/17 — Heydon Hatcher

By Mackenzie Smith

Half of the kale and spring onions marinate in a dressing while their counterparts are fried until crispy and bitter. The tart rice vinegar is mellowed out by a healthy dose of maple and, which will make your spring onions sing. This salad is hefty enough to split between two people for a meal, but it also does a fine job as a side dish to something “more substantial”. Top with a fried egg if you’re feelin’ fancy.

Make sure you start with kale that has been washed and well-dried-- any water left on those leaves will keep the leaves from frying.

Blackened Kale Salad with Quinoa & Spring Onion
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • Maple syrup
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa (any cooked grain works)
  • 1 bunch kale, chopped into small pieces and divided into two separate bowls
  • ⅓ - ½ canola oil
  • Black sesame seeds
Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.

Mix rice vinegar, sesame oil, soy sauce and maple syrup together, then stir in half the onions. Pour over raw kale, and stir in your quinoa. Heat oil in a large skillet. The oil will be hot enough to start frying when you can place a wooden spoon in the oil and bubbles start to form around the spoon. Add the rest of the onions to the oil, and cook long enough for them to infuse your frying oil-- about 30 seconds. Add enough kale to cover the bottom of the pan and stir once to move the oil and the onions. Resist the urge to stir again, until the kale starts to turn dark brown and crisp, about 4-5 minutes. Then, flip the kale with a spatula so the uncooked side can char. Once you have your first handful of blackened kale & onions, add them to the raw kale & quinoa and mix well. Repeat the steps it took to char your chopped kale until it’s all cooked, this usually takes 1 or two more rounds in the skillet, depending on how big your pan is. Add more oil to the pan if you need to. Salt and pepper to finish your salad, and sprinkle with sesame seeds before serving.

A LETTER FROM THE HEAD FARMER - SATURDAY'S PICNIC & GARDEN GALLOP!

03/31/17 — Heydon Hatcher

To Our Dear Farm Community,

You might have heard through the grapevine that our Spring Picnic and Garden Gallop 5K is this weekend. Well, this event holds a very special place in my heart and always takes me back to the farm's humble beginnings. At the advent of this whole farm endeavor, back when I was still slingin' veggies from my backyard on Holly Street in 2005, I started really cultivating relationships with my farmers market customers. I don't know if it was all the many varied multi-colored eggs (thanks to the almost 30 different kinds of chickens I had) or my "selling-grilled-cheese-and-following-the-Grateful-Dead" stories that drew us together; regardless, my customers and I started to bond and connect. I started gathering email addresses and sending out weekly newsletters about the goings-on at the farm... I enjoyed writing my farm-friends so thoroughly that I would compose farm updates at my government job! Whoops! Once I started the JBG CSA, an idea that I had been interested in and researched since college, if you can believe it, and moved out to the 20 acres at Hergotz in the Spring of 2006, I had a lightbulb moment of inviting the community out to spend time where their food is grown. That was our inaugural farm-tour and picnic... Beth made her fa(r)mous homemade chocolate chip cookies and about 25 folks made the trek out to see the farm. Going from a backyard to a 20 acre plot warrants some serious celebration!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Bands at Hergotz Potluck. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Potluck at Hergotz. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck at Hergotz. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ten years later, it's hard to believe how much the event has changed. This weekend, I'm looking forward to seeing old and new friends in this perfect spring weather. You can participate in the run (curated by the one and only Rogue Running) and explore all the farm has to offer whilst getting your sweat on if you’d like, but be sure to stick around and enjoy the delicious food and boot-stompin’ tunes. There is a $10 donation to the bands, High Plains Jamboree and The Possum Posse, whose musical stylings will surely please. While you are on the farm, be sure to check out some of the exciting new projects that have been in the works... mosey over to the vineyard to check the progress of the baby grapes, the mandarin oranges on the south side of the greenhouse (30 of ‘em!), and last but not least the hundred pecan trees that we just recently planted (they are just starting to sprout!). Be sure to sneak a peek at the first green tomatoes that are in the hoop house, too. Summer crops are on the way! If you don't have time to make a dish to share, don't fret, AISD's brand spankin' new food truck, Nacho Average Food Truck, will be there slingin' delectable fares.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck dish. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Potluck shenanigans. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck shenanigans. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sandpile adventures. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Thanks again to everyone who came out to our 2017 Transplant Sale, it really was the best one yet. We can't wait to see you on Saturday!

Cheers, Brenton

WEEK 13 IN PHOTOS

03/31/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Update by Montana Stovall

This week at the farm we are planting peppers, eggplant, okra, lettuce, kohlrabi, summer squash, more tomatoes, and cucumbers! We are sowing green beans, sunflowers, and winter squash. We have been busy weeding our spring root crops, and hilling our potato crop... It might be the best root crop we have ever had! Our first round of tomatoes are established and loving this weather. They will be packing on new growth after the nice rain we had Tuesday night. The farm looks amazingly green right now, just in time for the Picnic and Garden Gallop this Saturday!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplants ready to go in the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Montana scoping out the soil. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Will workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. SUNFLOWER! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Lettuce harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rows and rows. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Basil! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Green tomatoes. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Hoop house dreams. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Working hard in the office. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Working hard in the office. Photo by Scott David Gordon.
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