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LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

BREAKFAST CRESCENT RING

08/23/16 — Heydon Hatcher

IMG_2251by Megan Winfrey

It's been awhile since I've done a breakfast post, and this one has me all sorts of excited. You will be too when you see how easy it is to put together, and how impressive it looks when it's done! This is a perfect dish for a brunch-y get together, whether it's a baby shower or a business lunch. It feeds 4-8 people, and other ingredients can easily be substituted to your heart's delight!

Breakfast Crescent Ring
  • 1 can of pre-cut crescents
  • 8 slices of bacon, cooked
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/4 cup of milk
  • 2 small or 1 large bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • salt and pepper, to taste
IMG_2248

Preheat the oven to 375ºF.

Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Unroll the crescents into 8 triangles and lay them out on the parchment paper in a circle with the tips pointing out, like a sun. The base corners of each triangle should be touching all the way around to make a circle. Spread half of the shredded cheddar evenly around the circle and lay one slice of cooked bacon down on each crescent.

Heat a skillet to medium high, add a little olive oil, and cook the peppers and onions until translucent. Beat the eggs and milk in a bowl, then add to the peppers and onions. Salt and pepper to taste, then cook until the eggs are done and fluffy. Spread the scrambled eggs evenly around the circle, then top with the rest of the cheese.

Fold the tip of each crescent inwards towards the circle. It will look sort of like a wreath!

Bake for about 20 minutes, until the crescents are golden brown. A quick slice of the corners and you have 8 beautiful servings!

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CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF AUG 22ND

08/23/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Aug 22nd CSA Box Contents Week of Aug 22nd

Large Box
Beet, Red
Cucumber, Slicing
Eggplant , Graffiti
Greens, Spinach, Malabar
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Peppermint
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Pepper, Serrano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Peppermint
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Pepper, Serrano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Small Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Basil
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Graffiti
Greens, Sweet Potato
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Squash, Butternut

CSA SPOTLIGHT: SALT & TIME

08/19/16 — Heydon Hatcher

 

Felt like time was moving at a snail’s pace, unhurriedly sludging along in the mud at the start of the week, but looking back, where has it gone? Like sand in a sieve, another week is rollin’ on by. In the Daily Dirt this week, we chat about our beloved community supported agriculture program, or CSA, and highlight one of the reigning locavore champs in town that serve as a CSA pick-up location: Salt & Time!

 

Today's Lunch Special is a char grilled lamb burger with pepper aioili on a pretzel bun.

A photo posted by saltandtime (@saltandtime) on





You may have heard of a CSA before, but for those who haven’t, simply put, it’s a way to get seasonal, local and organic produce straight from the farm, weekly or bi-weekly. Depending on how many people you feed, we have four different box sizes to cater to your lifestyle. Don’t like kohlrabi? Not a problem, we allow you to customize your share and swap out the veggies that you just can’t handle. We deliver these shares all over Austin (and Houston, San Antonio, and Dallas!) to offices, grocery stores, restaurants, and homes alike (check out all the pick-up locations here). The CSA program is our darling on the farm: it provides us with the working capital we need to kick off the season (buy seeds, prep beds, hire staff), and also keeps the farm running, even when Mother Nature has another idea entirely.



Salt & Time

"Good things come to those who add salt and wait"



A quick and brief history of this meat-tastic haunt: Ben Runkle started Salt & Time in 2010, serving up dry cured meats to the masses at farmers markets around Austin. When the powerhouse duo of Ben Runkle and Bryan Butler were introduced soon after, they quickly jived on the idea of opening a butcher shop that focused on obtaining meat directly and solely from Texas ranchers. In 2013, their idea came to fruition when the brick and mortar opened on East 7th Street. This butcher-shop, restaurant, and salumeria has been lauded locally and nationally since their ‘13 open, check out some of the praise here, here, here and here.

 



A butcher and his meat. Come on in and stock up, we are open until 6!

A photo posted by saltandtime (@saltandtime) on


This butcher-shop features the best meats from sustainable Texas ranches as well as offering an unmatched selection of house-made sausages, salumi, and charcuterie. Salt & Time supports other Austin businesses by offering artisanal provisions from local producers in house, ranging from cheeses to jams to hoppy beers. Not only do they proudly provide all these delectable goods to grab ‘n go, but their lunch, dinner, and Sunday brunch is off-the-charts delicious. Their menu is an inventive medley of high quality meats and locally cultivated produce with an amazing beer and wine list to pair. Dining out with a vegetarian? Don't fret, S&T usually offers a more herbivorous option for those inclined to skip the meat.

One of the reasons we love this pick-up location so dearly is that in one fell swoop, you can grab your JBG veggies, peruse the extensive menu of staple goods, snag some cured meats, and cozy up to the bar with a friend and a delightful beverage. Long time CSA member, Kim, says “for the past several years, we loved that we could pick up our butchers box and CSA at the same time! Plus, we could snag any extra meat to go with the veggies, making meal coordination simpler!”

Did you know that at Salt & Time, you can how to butcher and cure meats in house? Check out a current list of what classes they are offering here

 

Amazing lunch. Love this restaurant and highly recommend it to my austiners!

A photo posted by DD (@daniellederagopian) on





The mission of this nonpareil butcher-shop-restaurant really captures the spirit of community supported agriculture, and we are immensely proud to partner with Salt & Time for this Thursday afternoon CSA drop. Plus, we’ve heard their cane syrup bacon goes great with just about every vegetable we grow. What are you waiting for? Pop on by the east side, and see what all the rave is about! 'Til next time, folks!

Matt workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Matt workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Know any other local shops that you think would fit our CSA model? Drop us a line… we’d love to hear from you! Need more reasons to join our CSA? Check out 26 good ones here.

WEEK 33 IN PHOTOS

08/19/16 — Heydon Hatcher

160817_SDG292988

Week 33, a week of torrential rains and lots o' mud.  Other than the farm being a big ole mud-pit, we are grateful for the much needed cool-down!  We stopped by the Triangle Farmers Market on Wednesday to catch up with some North-Central Austin veggie lovers and the farmer market pros, Lindsey + Adams. A very happy belated birthday to our very talented staff photographer, Scott David Gordon, and a huge thanks to him for another batch of wonderful images.

Okra harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Okra harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ravishing red OKRA! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Ravishing red OKRA! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

I spy squash. Photo by Scott David Gordon. I spy squash. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Squash blossom. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Squash blossom. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Squash harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Squash harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

8-ball squash. Photo by Scott David Gordon. 8-ball squash. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Beautiful field. Photo by Scott David Gordon. A moment of sun. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Starter mix. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Starter mix. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Seeding. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Seeding. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Okra harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Cucumber harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

HOT HOT HOT. Photo by Scott David Gordon. HOT HOT HOT. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Watermelon reach. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Watermelon reach. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA boxes veggin' out. Photo by Scott David Gordon. CSA boxes veggin' out. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Matt slingin' per usual. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Matt Pelkey, workin' hard! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Our chariots. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Our chariots. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Triangle Farmers Market. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Triangle Farmers Market. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Don't settle for medi-okra-ty, for real. Photo by Scott David Gordon. NEVER settle for medi-okra-ty, wiser words were never spoken. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sunflower slingin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sunflower slingin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Lindsey and . Thanks for all the hard work! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Lindsey and . Thanks for all the hard work! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF AUG 15TH

08/16/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Aug 15th CSA Box Contents Week of Aug 15th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Cucumber, Slicing
Eggplant , Graffiti
Greens, Spinach, Malabar
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Peppermint
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Pepper, Serrano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Peppermint
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Pepper, Serrano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Small Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Basil
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Graffiti
Greens, Sweet Potato
Melon, Farmers Choice
Okra
Squash, Butternut

SPICY TURKEY JALAPENO POPPERS

08/16/16 — Heydon Hatcher

IMG_1879by Megan Winfrey

I am a very proud Texan, and anyone who knows me will attest to it. I am a 7th generation, bluebonnet tattoo sportin' BBQ snob who wouldn't dare order unsweetened tea. There are many reasons to love our great state - politics ain't one of 'em - but jalapeño poppers sure are! Poppers are one of those things that seem truly unique to Texas. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I've met quite a few others* who had never heard of or experienced the euphoria of a perfect jalapeño popper. The horror! Lucky for us, we live in Texas, where they even sell pre-made poppers at the grocery store. But these...oh, these are much better. I made the mistake of trying one before photographing them, and we're lucky I was able to stop myself long enough to snap some.

*people not from Texas

Spicy Turkey Jalapeño Poppers
  • 15-20 jalapeño peppers
  • 1 lb. ground turkey
  • 2 (8 oz.) packets of cream cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded Mexican Blend cheese, divided
  • 1 tbs. chili powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. oregano
  • 1/4 tsp. black pepper
IMG_1878

Preheat oven to 400ºF.

Wear rubber gloves while preparing the peppers, removing the seeds and ribs. Line them up on a foil lined baking sheet and set aside.

In a large bowl, add cream cheese, mayonnaise, half of the cheese, and the spices. Mix thoroughly with a hand mixer.

In a skillet, cook the turkey over medium-high until fully cooked and broken apart. Stir the turkey into the cream cheese mixture while hot, and combine well. Fill each jalapeño boat with the turkey mixture, piling each one slightly. Top each with the remaining cheese, or more if necessary.

Bake in the top third of the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbly and browned on top.

Serve immediately.

PLENTIFUL PEPPERS

08/12/16 — Heydon Hatcher

1

With an endless string of over 100 degree days under our belt, marinating in our own sweat has become commonplace. And while we are struggling to keep from going heat-crazy, our pepper crops are basking in the sunshine, and thriving in the brutal heat.  Here’s to the Capsicum genus, ranging from flaming hot to sweet as sugar, you make the dog days of summer worthwhile!

A Brief History

Originating in South America thousands of years ago, these members of the nightshade family’s cultivation spread to Central America soon after, and ultimately, through the Columbian Exchange (wherein Christopher Columbus kindled a massive exchange of goods between the Eastern and Western hemispheres during the 15th and 16th centuries) to Europe. Currently, peppers are utilized worldwide, enriching a plethora of different culinary traditions, from Spanish chorizo and Indian capsicum curry to the Congolese pili-pili sauce.

Serrano sortin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Serrano sortin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Nutritional Fun Facts

  • All peppers have differing levels of capsaicin, a chemical compound that dissolves in fats and oils, in them. Bell peppers have little to none, and habaneros have some of the highest levels. This chemical causes a burning sensation on whatever tissue with which it comes into contact. This keeps mammals from eating the hotter peppers, because of the undesirable and sometimes painful side effects; whereas birds, whose receptors are largely unaffected by it, indulge in peppers and spread the seeds.
  • No wonder it burns! Capsaicin is known to aid in burning fat and boost metabolism!
  • A red, yellow, or green bell pepper has more Vitamin C than an orange, and are good sources of carotenoids, which act as antioxidants in the body as well as support ocular and epidermal health. The more they ripen, the more nutrition you get!
  • Hot or sweet, peppers have a ton of B vitamins as well, namely B6, which higher consumption of is known to quell heart disease and stroke.
 

JBG Pepper Breakdown - Recipes

You can dry ‘em, grind ‘em, use ‘em fresh, stuff ‘em, roast ‘em, or pickle ‘em! Check out our breakdown of peppers with recipe ideas below!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Bell Pepper - Looking at the bell pepper harvest is always mesmerizing. These peppers have the most stunning spectrum of colors (see food-gradient image below), and are the darling of the sweet pepper category.  The taste changes with the color… red being the ripest and sweetest. A JBG favorite recipe is the culturally ubiquitous stuffed bell pepper.

Carmen - Known as the corno di toro, or bull’s horn, this Italian pepper bears a sweet taste perfect when they are at a deep red hue.  These puppies are delicious roasted whether as a side dish or on an antipasto plate!

Ringo - Better known as the percussionist from the Beatles (Google Image Ringo Peppers and see what you get), this thick-skinned and meaty pepper turns a bright yellow as it ripens.  It has a long, horn-like shape that is similar to the Carmen.  This sweet tasting pepper is superb for garnish on a salad, or stuffed!  We could all get by with a little help from this succulent pepper.

Shishito - A Central Texas favorite, this mild little pepper hailing from East Asia is great for tempura, or a quick saute. Take a peek at our resident recipe blogger’s most recent escapade into the blissful blistering of these green beauties.  Watch out though, most of these peppers are on the milder side, but once in a blue moon you’ll get a kick of spicy shishito! BAM!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Artistic stylings by Ada Broussard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Artistic stylings by Ada Broussard.

Banana - A mild pepper known for its banana-like aesthetics. This pepper is perfect for pickling, a yummy addition to sandwiches.

Poblano - These mild heart-shaped peppers have a nice, subtle, earthy heat. They add the perfect amount of spice to any dish. We love them in chile rellenos!

Jalapeño - Smooth and green (turning red as they ripen), these peppers are milder and wider than serranos.  These are sublime stuffed with cheese and wrapped with bacon or as a sauce... we’re thinking specifically of Tacodeli’s dreamy Doña sauce!

Serrano - Originating from the mountains in Mexico, these green, (turning red as they ripen like the jalapeño) spindly little peppers can pack a punch! Hotter when they are smaller, serranos are used frequently in a lot of salsas and sauces

Habanero - This vibrant orange and wrinkly pepper, although small, packs SO. MUCH. HEAT.  It is known as one of the spiciest peppers, and as such, makes for the perfect hot sauce ingredient.  Dr. Stadnyk’s uses our habaneros to make their delectable hot sauce infused with carrots to subdue the amount of heat.

5 Spicy ones. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Staff Survey: What’s your favorite pepper, and why?

Michael Mosley (our resident hot sauce expert, soon to be judge at the upcoming 26th annual Austin Chronicle Hot Sauce Festival): Definitely the Serrano. Good heat but not too much. Adds flavor and depth to foods without overpowering them.

Charlotte McClure: I have to say red bell peppers because they're so versatile. I love them raw, eaten like an apple or sliced and dipped in hummus. Or chopped and mixed with quinoa, black beans and corn for a super easy skillet dinner. But the BEST thing to do is stuff them with goat cheese, grains, shredded chicken and herbs, then roast them till the skin begins to blacken.

Matt Pelkey: The Hinklehatz [which we don't grow anymore]. Best flavored hot pepper.

Montana Stovall: Candied jalapeños for the win. It's a super sweet yet spicy. I usually do a big batch at last frost with mostly red japs. Keep on farming! And eating well!

Ada Broussard: My favorite pepper is a red bell pepper... I like to eat them whole, like an apple, which is convenient, because I'm allergic to apples. They are my apple. A perfect snack to throw in a bag.

Kenny Woodson: Shishito, because it's fun to say ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Hurry up and grab these peppers before they are gone, just like summer! We’ll leave you with the tiny wisdoms of a nursery rhyme to ponder… Til next time, folks!

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers; A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked; If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

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